Monthly Archives: October 2016

Trash Right, Live Right

It was an evening after close of business. Home was calling and the roads were busy. He finished his wrap of sausage roll and out of the window of the car, the wrapper flew. 


Saturdays have a way of making us do some kind of sanitation – wholesome or partial. Homes are cleaned up, surroundings are tidied up and the resulting trash is packaged or heaped outside the gates for the authorities to pick up. 

In Lagos, the Lagos Waste Management Agency (LAWMA) is in charge of managing the trash from such sanitation exercise with trucks coming around almost every weekend to pick up trash and refuse but I am more interested today in the trash they gather on the roads and highways.

When you enter a City, the roads are the first things you notice – good & clean or bad & dirty or a mixture of both. The 1st day I stepped on the city of Owerri, I was marvelled. Clean roads from Orlu road through Wetheral and along Douglas. I trekked in admiration and wondered. I heard it was once the cleanest city but within the next 5 years after my 1st visit, the city had great moments of being gardened in huge dumps of refuse.

Douglas road was oozing to the heavens despite having one of the largest market in the City. Recently I heard the state government had to leave the mountain heap of refuse that took as much as a lane on each side of the road as a payback to the people. Seriously? Let’s not talk about Aba. We can say positive things about Enugu, Ilorin, Abeokuta and a few other cities.

That aside, nothing bothers me most than seeing a road commuter throw thrash through the car window on the road. On my way back from work few months ago, a plastic bottle flew out of a public bus into the road with so much velocity that it could crack the windscreen of another vehicle. We had to swerve to avoid the bottle. The bottle with other of its cousins will play along the road until someone picks them up. Who? The street sweeper from the waste management agency.

What kind of education do you have that gives you a pat on the back for throwing thrash on the road and expecting an “uneducated” person to pick it up and make the city clean for you to brag that “I live in a clean city”?

A testimony was shared in a big branch of a very big church in Lekki. The lady stopped on the bridge to throw thrash into the waters below. She noticed a man on the other side of the bridge crossing over to most probably rob them. They had to zoom off without polluting the waters. Everyone praised God but the water had the ultimate victory – saved by an unknown.

Cleanliness is next to godliness it is said but it is not restricted to how clean your clothes are or how tidy your living room,  kitchen or other room are. How do you affect your environment? Do you also fling plastic bottles, snack wrappers, papers off the vehicle? You would prefer to have your car tidy to causing nuisance on the same road you ply? Tomorrow, you would be the first to say the roads are untidy? 

They may be doing the dirty job of keeping the roads clean but I must commend the street sweepers and members of the waste management agency that ensure the roads are swept regularly. This post is for them. They endanger their lives, working on the roads and highways, picking up the products of your iresponsibility. Please respect them. Drive carefully when you see them in action. 

More importantly, live responsibly. Keep your trash in your car till you see a trashbin. God abhors dirtiness and irresponsibility. Check yourself and live right.

Trash right.

@AmosCP

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Tales From FEGO: HSC Block

 

Inside A Room in Main Block – There were no fans in those days (courtesy: Damola)

One quick jump and I was away, out of the hostel through my window. I was on my heels away from the officials that have come to gidi us on that Saturday morning. For heavens sake, it was not an inspection Saturday but I had to make use of my window – the one good and bad aspect of my stay in the oldest hostel in FEGO. The HSC Block.

Sandwiched between New Block and PTA Block, the HSC Block used to be assigned to the JSS2 students until Government Block was built. In front of HSC Block stood the school mosque and the dispensary just around. At the back was a large grass land which formed a major part of Saturday morning clearance. Sometimes ridden with snakes, bush rats and all sort of grass loving animals, it was our duty to clear those grasses so that we could see any activity on the Ikoyi road the staff quarters beyond.

With a big quadrangle, HSC had a good space for Saturday indoor football. Although baptized with wicked stones, the boys shunned those hindrances in making sure they enjoyed themselves – with approvals from the hostel officials for sure. In this quadrangle was the open bath. No one used the walled baths because they were conducive. The open bath had 4 tap outlets through which water flows in the afternoons.

HSC was divided into two parallel building blocks. Chad and Cross houses were on one block as usual. Niger and Osun houses made do with the other block. Each block had 4 rooms with 2 for each house. For each two rooms assigned to each house there are two micro-mini rooms acting as dividers. I want to believe these rooms were not meant for living but we had captains and prefect who used them as heavens. Although small, it was a hub for Ironing, kpoksing and many more.

I moved into Room A of the rooms for Cross House. I got a corner by the wall and lived out my days in HSC block there. I spent two years in HSC block no thanks to the commissioning of the Government at the beginning of my second year. So I spent JSS2 and JSS3 in HSC. I dreaded wearing shorts in Main Block and was happy to spend one more year in the ancient HSC Block.

This brings me back to the opening part of this post. I returned from the long vacation, ready for another adventure. Lo and behold, I could not find my window net nor the louvers. I was exposed to the outside world but it was a quick entrance and exit from the hostel – just don’t be caught. It was a regular escape route for me in those dark mornings when the officials come around to gidi of punish.  I was near invisible.

Yemi joined me in the corner as an SS1 boy and I learnt some tricks from him. His friends frequented the corner and one of such friends had artificial rains falling on me from the top bunk one night. Sadly, when he was woken up, he stepped down, jumped out and cased closed.

There are so many other tales from HSC block – the bunk shakers, the ghost riders, the smelling gutters, jacked lockers, chained mattresses, space travels and many more.

Tiri gbosa for HSC Block. Ehen!! You know HSC means Higher School Certificate?

Enjoy your day and share your HSC experience with us.

@AmosCP